Student Evidence/Reflections


Hello out there CAS Coordinators:

Recently my seniors have started giving me lame, lazy evidence and reflections for their activities. So I sent them this reminder:

Hi Seniors, I just want to clarify that I can’t approve CAS activities until you provide evidence/reflections that are acceptable to IB. Take a look at the CAS Quick Start Guide which can be found under the Files menu at the top of your ManageBac account. Look especially at 2 sections: “Reflection” and “Recording & Reporting.” This will give you some guidelines as to what IB expects when you provide evidence/reflections.

A photo, video, or link to a website is fine, but rarely is this sufficient on it’s own to explain how you met the learning outcomes you stated or the 5 big things IB is looking for from your evidence:

  1. What happened
  2. Why it happened
  3. How it happened
  4. What its value was
  5. What you learned from it

If you post a pic or video you will most likely need to provide some written commentary as well.

Remember: your evidence/reflections need to show:

  • How you met the learning outcomes you stated you’d meet through the activity
  • The 5 big things IB is looking for

So that was my message. We shall see if it has any effect on the quality of their evidence/reflections, but I thought it was a good idea to clarify for them what their evidence/reflections is supposed to show me. By the way, the CAS Quick Start Guide can be found on the Documents page of CAS Corner.

Anyways, I hope this helps somebody out there. Have a great year :)

Sample Reflection with Explanations


A friend of mine, Aundrea Croft, Coordinator of Community Service & CAS at Lake Wales High School, was asking me to help her brainstorm ideas on how her students could develop truly meaningful reflections for their CAS activities. After many email exchanges, we decided that I had no useful ideas and that I was utterly no help to her. Haha.

So this brilliant young lady developed her own sample reflection (with explanations) on how each Learning Outcome was met. It is a really, REALLY good example for students on how they can show that they met the Learning Outcomes that they said they were going to meet through an activity. Aundrea even shows how students can meet the hardest Learning Outcome of all time, Learning Outcome #7: “Consider the Ethical Implications of Their Actions.”

Check it out on the documents page on this blog. I don’t think I’m being hyperbolic when I say it’s amazingly awesome :)

Happy Holidays!

Documents Removed


The following documents were removed from the Documents page at the request of the IBO. These documents are available at the OCC (Online Curriculum Centre). To access the OCC you’ll need a username and password which you can obtain from your IB Coordinator.

Handbook of Procedures 2011

IB Learner Profile

CAS Guide

CAS/PQ

8 Learning Outcomes

Model Form A: CAS Progress Form

Model Form B: CAS Individual Student Completion Form

Learning Outcome #7: Considered the ethical implications of their actions


The CAS curriculum states: Ethical decisions arise in almost any CAS activity (for example, on the sports field, in musical composition, in relationships with others involved in service activities). Evidence of thinking about ethical issues can be shown in various ways, including journal entries and conversations with CAS advisers.

A very helpful guideline can be downloaded here thanks to Molly Peterson, Fairhope, Alabama USA: CAS Learning Outcome #7: consider the ethical implications

Learning Outcome #8


The focus of IB students and their CAS activities is to meet the 8 Learning Outcomes at least once.

Learning Outcome #8 is stated as: Developed new skills.

Clarifying explanation: As with new challenges, new skills may be shown in activities that the student has not previously undertaken, or in increased expertise in an established area.

I interpret Learning Outcome #8 as “Students need to engage in an activity in which they’ve never before participated in and in which they will learn something new, either about themselves or about someone or something else.”

Learning Outcome #7


The focus of IB students and their CAS activities is to meet the 8 Learning Outcomes at least once.

Learning Outcome #7 is stated as: Considered the ethical implications of their actions.

Clarifying explanation: Ethical decisions arise in almost any CAS activity (for example, on the sports field, in musical composition, in relationships with others involved in service activities). Evidence of thinking about ethical issues can be shown in various ways, including journal entries and conversations with CAS advisers.

I interpret Learning Outcome #7 as “This is the most difficult learning outcome to achieve because it’s the most difficult to interpret, measure, and plan for. Students need to evaluate right from wrong in an activity that they’re engaged in and this is not easy to do. I agree that students need to be able to choose right actions from wrong actions and be able to determine if another person’s actions are right or wrong, but this is not easy to plan for. I’m not very much help when students ask me how to achieve this outcome because I don’t know how to help them plan for this. Maybe IBO could reconsider this learning outcome or at least the wording of it.”

Learning Outcome #6


The focus of IB students and their CAS activities is to meet the 8 Learning Outcomes at least once.

Learning Outcome #6 is stated as: Engaged with issues of global importance.

Clarifying explanation: Students may be involved in international projects but there are many global issues that can be acted upon locally or nationally (for example, environmental concerns, caring for the elderly).

I interpret Learning Outcome #6 as “it would be best if students could broaden their worlds by engaging in activities that focus on other parts of the globe, but it’s also ok if students focus on activities that are an issue in any part of the world, such as environmental concerns or caring for the elderly.”